CCGaDay Day 7: Most "intellectual" CCG owned

I'm not entirely sure how to interpret this one.

Is an intellectual game one that is complicated? Or one with lots of words on the cards?

Luckily, I know one that's both: Sim City: The Card Game.

Why is it "intellectual"? Sadly, there doesn't seem to be high-res versions of the cards to link to, but here's the text from one of the cards I have:


Receive 1 for each covered Residential and Commercial and 2 for each covered Industrial; new coverage only. Add 1 to all covered Residentials and Commercials and 2 to all covered Industrials. Coverage range is 8 minus Crime Factor.

That's just the game text - there's also four different stats, plus roads and rails along the card border.

I could go into a mess of detail on how all this works, but it's simpler to put it this way - this is a card game that is a reasonably faithful version of the computer game it's based on. And that's it's biggest weakness - the amount of math the game wants is staggering, because a lot of cards not only score points based on what ever is on the table, but also add points to cards already on the table, which can turn scoring (or heaven forbid, recounting) into an exercise in pain.

As a CCG, it really worked better using the single-deck variant (instead of each player bringing their own). It was sort of an early "cube" (long before that term meant anything in CCGs), and let the owner craft the game experience by putting more or less of various card types. You could add the city council cards (which caused players votes), or decide to skip the double-sized cards that renovated (and replaced) existing cards on the table.

There are certainly simpler (and I daresay better for their simplicity) games in the city-building genre, but SimCity has a certain charm for choosing fidelity to the source material over "dumbing it down". And that's intellectual enough for me.

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